Wednesday, October 26, 2016

New Separates Range Photos

We've been working hard over winter to bring you our new range of women's wetsuit.
Available in store now and online very shortly.


2mm Front Zip Vest with 2mm Leggings

2mm Front Zip Jacket with 2mm Leggings

New Style 0.5mm Titanium Hot Top with 2mm Shorts

2mm shorts (Reversible)

2mm Front zip Vest

0.5mm Titanium Hot Top


Monday, May 23, 2016

10 ways to boost your water time this winter

1. Invest in a really good wetsuit.

Firstly, if you’re surfing in New Zealand (or anywhere cold) you’re gonna need a really good wetsuit. Ideally this suit needs to to be sealed and made from Yamamoto limestone neoprene.
A really warm winter suit might seem expensive but if you only wear it for the coldest winter months it will last you many season. (look after it and it will look after you).
http://www.seventhwave.co.nz/shop/winterwetsuits.html
Seventhwave's Winter Range [shop here]

2. Wear a hood.

Yep we know they suck to wear but up to 80% of body heat escapes through your neck and head.
Choose a hood that has a generous length cuff that way you’ll have a good overlap with the collar on your wetsuit.
There is two ways you can wear your hood, either have it sitting over your wetsuit collar - this way will eliminate and water flushing down your collar when you duck dive. The other option is to tuck your hood into your collar - this way you’ll create a tighter seal around your neck, but you are more exposed to water sneaking in when duck diving. Either way is ok but you’ll probably find one is more comfortable.
If you can afford - it choose a wetsuit that has interchangeable or fixed hood these are the most comfortable and leak the least.
Shop Hoods [here]

3. While you’re in the water, keep moving.

Especially if it’s a windy day, instead of sitting there waiting for waves, go for a paddle around even in quick little bursts it’ll keep your blood flowing and increase your water time.
Also it’ll take your mind off the cold.


4. When you’re getting changed make sure you have something warm to change into.

Woollen clothes are the fastest way to warm up, so invest in some woollen socks and a nice thick jersey.
Part of lasting in cold water is mentally knowing that you’ve got something warm to change into when you get out of the water.
Also if you haven’t got a good towel you could always invest in a cozy changing poncho these are great for changing in terrible weather.
Curve hooded poncho - from Seventhwave [buy]


5. Get some thick booties and gloves.

Booties arguably suck more than hoods, until you get used to them you feel like your trying to surf in gumboots. They are the only way to avoid numb toes.
Most people probably won’t notice the difference between 2mm, 3mm and 5mm boots, so just get the thickest boots you can find (also thicker booties will last longer and still do the trick with small holes). Make sure your booties have a split toe (internal or external) this minimizes slippage and increases sensitivity. Gloves feel just as bulky as booties but keep you noticeably warmer.
Buy gloves and boots [here]

6. Warm after surf shower.

If you drive to the beach, take a big bottle of hot water and use it to give yourself quick boost of warmth when you come in.
Extra tip: As soon as you unlock your car, start it up and crank the heater - By the time you get changed your car will be tropical.


7. Check your wetsuit for holes before winter kicks in.

Before the water gets cold, cast your eye over your wetsuit for holes and leaky or worn seams, you can either fix your suit yourself or send it to us for a service.

 

8. Make sure your wetsuit is dry before you head to the beach.

There’s many ways to dry your suit, but in the depths of winter keep it under cover so it’s not frosty for the dawnie. Let it drip dry in the shower and it should be dry in the morning. If you need to speed it up a bit, squeeze the water out of the lower arms and legs out every 20 minutes or so.


9. Before you start paddling out splash a little bit of cold water on your face.

This doesn’t warm you up but it takes away the cold shock when you duck dive under that first wave or take your first beatdown/wipeout.
Photograph by Chris Burkard - www.chrisburkard.com


10. Layer up.

If you’re planning on spending a long time in the water and your top of the line suit just isn’t cutting the mustard, wear an extra layer on your core. It’s best to wear a neoprene top if your suit is flushing or leaking. If your suit is super sealed you might be ok wearing a polyprop or something similar but often when these type of layers get wet you’ll struggle to warm up again.


                              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit, to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a warmer way.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
And best of all - check out our website!


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Thursday, May 28, 2015

Seventhwave: Did You Know? 1. Limestone neoprene vs Oil-based Neoprene

Did you know that limestone-based neoprene is much warmer than oil based neoprene?
In this blog we'll run through the major difference.

Yamamoto limestone-based neoprene has a higher closed air cell content (approx 94%), this means there are more individual air bubbles inside the neoprene, each air cell/bubble is waterproof. This makes it nearly impossible for any water to soak in.

In oil-based neoprene, the closed cell content is only approximately 60%, the remaining 40% of cells absorb water.

A detailed view of Limestone and Oil-Based neoprene [click to enlarge]



Advantages of Yamamoto limestone neoprene:

-Less absorbtion making it warmer to wear and faster to dry.
-More air content making it lighter and more comfortable.
-Uniformed cell structure, for a stronger bond.


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Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit, to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a warmer way.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
And best of all - check out our website!


How did you find this article? Want to hear more from Seventhwave?
Subscribe to receive our newsletter in your inbox.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The 2015 Single Fin Mingle - A Traditional Logging Competition

The inaugural “Single Fin Mingle took place over the weekend of the 20th-22nd of March 2015.

Poster artwork by Bradley King


The Single Fin Mingle was the first ever traditional longboard surfing competition to be held in the South Island.



Single Fin Mingle 2015 from Jono Smit on Vimeo.

Held at the infamous Sumner beach in Christchurch - widely known as the premier longboarding break in New Zealand (if not the world).
Sumner offers long rides and super playful sections, perfect for traditional longboarding.


A selection of the many single fins on show (Photo: Tom Owens)

The rules for the competition were simple:
1. Single fins only, with no provision for any other configuration (This means no side fin plugs)
2. No leashes allowed (you fall - you swim)
3. Boards must measure over 9ft and weigh a minimum of 8kg (all boards were weighed on competition day by chief board inspector: Simon Brown)
4. All surfing must be traditional - Basically how they surfed in the early sixties with emphasis on noseriding, cross stepping and style.
5. Gentlemens rules apply - this means no technical drop ins interference calls. (cooperation was just as valuable as competition - as there was a prize for best shared wave)

Board caddie - Nic Todd (Photo: Tom Owens)

48 competitors came together from all over the country to celebrate traditional logging, with strong turnouts from Dunedin, Mangawhai, New Plymouth and Sumner, the title was anyone's to take.

First on the agenda for the weekend was the registration.
After a beer and a short surf film at Sumner’s very own Hollywood theatre on Friday night, Saturday morning dawned bringing a bright sunny day and waist high waves.

The biggest highlight of the day was the outstanding surfing from the mostly unknown Logger: Ryan “Moose” Campbell who fought his way through a tough heat on an ancient 1960s Dunlop log. Unfortunately Moose let the fame go to his head and consumed too many ales at the Saturday night party only to miss his Sunday morning heat.

Speaking of the party: It went off - competitors, friends and family packed into the Sumner Beach Bar for a few cold jars and to listen to some great tunes provided by local surf band: The Wendys.

Hot groms: Seb Johnson and Luke O'Neill (Photo: Tom Owens)
Grant Pacey and Homa Mattingly - post heat yarn (Photo: Tom Owens)


Sunday morning arrived with a new swell, stiff southerly winds and cloudy skies.
Despite the cool and grey conditions, the surf was absolutely smoking - head high, groomed peelers were pouring through the bay and excitement was high.

The early heats set the trend for the day - everyone was shredding from young to old, guys and girls - never has Sumner seen such quality traditional surfing. All competitors were throwing down long hang fives, big hang tens, silky smooth rollercoasters and even the occasional head dip.

By lunchtime, the finalists had been decided and it was time for them to down a mandatory 3 star beer and get down to business.

Luke O'Neill with some clean footwork (Photo: Tom Owens)


The men's heat was an epic battle between four local surfers: Luke O’Neill, Nick Sarjeant, Grant Cochrane and Nic Todd.

All four had been shredding all weekend but in a close battle Nic Todd stomped two of the longest hang tens I’ve ever seen, to narrowly take the win and lead the party at Clink bar in Sumner.

Tony Baker stretching a hang five (Photo: Tom Owens)

Although the women's section was smaller than the men's, the surfing was still a high standard.

3 surfers from Dunedin dominated the woman's Final: Tash Mattingly, Daisy Thomas and Mischa Davis, the lone competitor representing Sumner was Nina Young.

All four girls managed to score some nice long rides but the biggest standout was Mischa Davis. With some controlled noserides and smooth cross stepping she managed to snare the win, closely followed by Daisy Thomas.






Overall it was an sensational weekend organised by Sumner legend: Ambrose McNeill (who unofficially won best dressed for his suited effort all weekend) (Photo: Tom Owens)



Overall champion, Nic Todd demonstrating his fine noseriding skills in the semi finals (Photo: Tom Owens)

Results:

Open:
1st: Nic Todd (Sumner) (World Champion of the World)
2nd: Nick Sarjeant (Sumner)
3rd: Luke O’Neill (Sumner)
4th: Grant Cochrane (Sumner)


Day two competition site (Photo: Tom Owens)


Womens:
1st: Mischa Davis (Piha & Dunedin)
2nd: Daisy Thomas (Dunedin)
3rd: Nina Young (Sumner)
4th: Tash Mattingly (Dunedin)
5th Equal: Alicia Erceg and Lili Bay (Both Sumner)

Best Beard: Sam Bound (New Plymouth)

Best Shared Wave: Daisy Thomas (Dunedin) and Tom Owens (Sumner)

Bolter of the event: Walt Robberds (Sumner)

Best Junior: Seb Johnson (Sumner)

Best Senior: Grant Cochrane

First round stylist: Homa Mattingly (Dunedin)

Mystery final winner: Dave Oswald (Sumner)

Wave of the Event: Luke Oneill (Sumner) - a huge hang heels

Thanks to all the sponsors below, without their generous support the event would not have been possible:

Mitre 10 Mega Ferrymead
Sadhana Surboards
Exit Surf
Surfing Tribe
Seventhwave Wetsuits
Garden City 2.0
Against The Grain Screen Printing and Graphic Design
Stoked Surf
Sumner Supervalue
Warren Hawk Photography
JD Smit Productions



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Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit, to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a warmer way.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
And best of all - check out our website!

Friday, June 27, 2014

Cycle Booties and Toe Covers - keep your feet warm and dry

Whether you're a daily commuter or a lightning fast racer, mountain biker or weekend warrior.
If you are an all year round cyclist, chances are, you sometimes find your feet get a bit cold and even wet.
We decided to design something that's easy to use, lightweight and protects your feet from the elements.
The Seventhwave Cycle Booties and Cycle Toe Covers are made from 2mm Yamamoto Neoprene, and come in either the high top Booties or low cut Toe Covers - depending on your preference.
Both styles keep your feet warm and dry. The Cycle Booties offer more coverage and seal your ankles from the rain.

Below are short videos showing how to use the Cycle Booties and Toe Covers. 



Click here to view and purchase the Cycle Booties online.
http://www.seventhwave.co.nz/shop/other+goodies/Cycle+Booties.html

The beauty with the Cycle Booties and Toe Covers is that they can be used with any type of shoe, and any type of cleat system or none at all. You only need one pair to fit either your Road or MTB shoes.
Some customers even wear them over running shoes. (Please note this will wear out the bottom very quickly)


Click here to view and purchase the Cycle Toe Covers online.
http://www.seventhwave.co.nz/shop/other+goodies/Cycle+Toe+Covers.html




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Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit, to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a warmer way.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
And best of all - check out our website!


How did you find this article? Want to hear more from Seventhwave?
Subscribe to receive our newsletter in your inbox.

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Wetsuit Tip #5: How to put wetsuit booties on easily

Booties just like wetsuits need to fit firmly and snugly around your feet to do the job and keep your feet comfortable and warm. They can be difficult to get on and off.
Following this procedure does make it easier.



For booties to be warm, they need to be tight, most surfers choose a size smaller than their regular shoe. A tight fit ensures no water will slosh around inside your boots.
Getting your boots on can be tricky. Luckily for you... we can help.

*This tip is only relative to high topped winter surf boots - low cut reef boots/shoes and dive boots with zips are easy to put on.

Step 1
Fold/turn the cuff down. The further you can fold them the easier it will be.

Step 2
Push your foot in as far as you can.

Step 3
Push against the ground, crawl/shimmy your toes as far forward as you can.

Step 4
Fold the cuff up, your foot should be covered by now. Don't yank the top of the cuff, this strains the heel and can rip.
Example of a ripped heel. This type of damage occurs when you pull too hard on the cuff.
Step 5
Gently pull the loop (if fitted) to slide your heel into place.
You don't want to pull too hard on the tab or the top of the cuff as this puts unnecessary stress on the join at the back of the heel.

Step 6
Wriggle your toes into position and adjust the cuff.

To take them off, simply reverse the process.

Interested in some new booties? Click here to view our range online


                           --------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit, to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a warmer way.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
And best of all - check out our website!


How did you find this article? Want to hear more from Seventhwave?
Subscribe to receive our newsletter in your inbox.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Wetsuit Tip #8: Harness the power of titanium


Technology has taken us to many new and exciting places – and often in unexpected ways.

Who would've thought that research done for the US space program back in the day would now be helping surfers to stay warmer in the water for longer! It sounds strange – but it's true.

Titanium-lined neoprene was developed by Japan's Yamamoto Corporation in the 1980s.

With this technology – based on NASA research aimed at reducing overheating during spaceship re-entry –  a thin Titanium Alpha metallic alloy coating is applied to the neoprene surface before the bonding of the outer  fabric.

The Titanium looks like a coating of silvery-grey paint.  Like all good ideas it's pretty simple, but it works.

In the water, as the thermal heat generated by your body tries to escape the wetsuit it hits the Titanium-lining that reflects the heat back towards you.

This happens continually. So every time you move, paddle, or expel energy, more heat is created inside your suit and reflected back to you—increasing heat retention by up to an amazing 40%.
 
How Titanium lined neoprene works. Source: Yamamoto Corporation

The great advantage is you can wear a much thinner, lighter wetsuit without compromising warmth.
The thinner the suit, the more flexible you are. You'll have more energy and power. Your paddle efficiency will sky rocket! You will catch more waves! 

At Seventhwave we use Yamamoto's Titanium lining in all our top-line models and extensively in our lightweight Titanium Lite Gear range. 

So next time you are looking to replace an old wetsuit or thinking of adding a whole new dimension to your water sports, consider the benefits of wearing a Titanium-lined limestone neoprene wetsuit from Seventhwave and experience the Power of Titanium.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

What do others say about their Seventhwave gear?


"Just had my first surf wearing that Seventhwave Hot Top which arrived over a week ago - The Hot Top turned an ordinary steamer into a toaster - really comfortable, easy to pull the suit over and I had the warmest session ever in small waves. Cant fault the build and the fit. Love that neck which seals and is so comfortable. Thanks for the prompt shipping and the emails regarding proper fit."
 
Cheers and thanks, Willie Burgess, Sydney, Australia 

"Eighteen months ago I purchased a MAX 2mm custom made Titanium wetsuit from Seventhwave, along with a Titanium Hot Top. Since then I have more than doubled the time I can spend in the water, even at temperatures of 16 to 20˚C. I recently added an Arctic Hood, 2mm gloves and a pair of 2mm Fin Sox. This can effectively triple my time in the water.

My Seventhwave Titanium wettie is the warmest, most comfortable suit I have ever worn. An added bonus is the after sales service at Seventhwave, which is really good."

Colleen Nacson, Sydney, Australia



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------





Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit, to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a warmer way.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
And best of all - check out our website!


How did you find this article? Interested to hear more from Seventhwave.
Subscribe to receive our newsletter in your inbox.

Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Wetsuit Tip #7: Choose Limestone neoprene for warmth and longevity


What is your wetsuit made out of?

This may seem a basic question – all wetsuits are made from the same stuff, right? Well, not exactly. All wetsuits are made from neoprene, yes,  but not all neoprene is the same.
There are two types of neoprene - oil-based or limestone-based. Most brands of wetsuits are made from oil-based neoprene. All Seventhwave wetsuits are made from limestone-based neoprene.
Yamamoto limestone neoprene ready for use
So, what's the difference? 
Oil-based neoprene - invented in the 1930s and used in the first wetsuits made in the 1950s, has a closed cell content of around 64% - that means water can be absorbed by the other 36%. Not bad, but not anywhere near as good as limestone neoprene.
Limestone neoprene - which is based on the calcium found in limestone - was invented in the 1960s by  the Yamamoto Corporation. This revolutionary fabric has a closed cell content of 94%! That means only 6% of the fabric can be penetrated by water!
So what does that mean for me? 
In the water:  because limestone neoprene does not absorb water as much as oil-based neoprene it makes it much warmer for longer and it's much lighter. More warmth and less weight = more comfort and staying out for longer. 
Out of the water:  limestone neoprene dries out much faster. In fact if you hang it outdoors after use and in a breeze (out of the sun) it will dry completely in a matter of 2-3 hours. Compare that to an oil-based neoprene wetsuit that can take 2 to 3 days to dry out!

Low absorption Yamamoto neoprene in action

So now that you know the difference – the choice is obvious!


For more reading and information:

The history of neoprene visit Neoprene: The Inside Story or download the eBook here.

For the quickest way to dry your wetsuit check our wetsuit tip  How To: Dry your Wetsuit the fastest way.

Check our other Blogs for wetsuit tips, education and product combinations and information. 

Visit our YouTube channel for how to and product videos.





Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit, to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a warmer way.

Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter
And best of all - check out our website!

Custom-Fit

ONLINE - Worldwide

Click here to get yours



How did you find this article? Interested to hear more from Seventhwave. Subscribe to receive our newsletter in your inbox.

 

Do you know know others who might benefit from this information? Please share our information for the best surf karma possible!

 

Friday, January 31, 2014

Wetsuit Tip #6: Go Custom and turn up the heat

Wetsuits have come a long way since their birth in the early 1950's. New construction methods, patterns and materials have enabled wetsuits to become warmer, lighter and more flexible.

Not only can you walk into most good surf stores these days and get kitted out with almost everything from a warm water vest for the tropics through to the full hoods and booties setup for the cold, you can even get a wetsuit made from scratch - a custom fit wetsuit, made to your measurements and local break requirements that's a perfect fit for your body and a perfect match for your local conditions.

What's the most critical feature of a comfy wetsuit? It needs to fit. Fit is the most important factor for maximum warmth and flexibility — you can have all the bells and whistles but if it doesn’t fit you’ve wasted your money. A bad fit means your wetsuit will flush water, bunch up and not keep you warm, preventing you reaching your peak in the water.

A Custom-fit Seventhwave wetsuit is made to fit your shape and size. They are made from imported Yamamoto neoprene from Japan. Yamamoto neoprene is made from the calcium found in Limestone and is very lightweight compared to the original type of neoprene made from oil. See the history of neoprene section on our website [here].

Every Seventhwave wetsuit is cut, printed and sewn by hand, right here on site, in Christchurch, New Zealand. Orders are received online via the Seventhwave website. Customers complete an online order for their desired wetsuit model and then forward the completed Custom-Fit form with their details.

Seventhwave Wetsuits - 243 Dyers Road, Christchurch, New Zealand


A Custom-Fit wetsuit does not just address the fit, but also takes into consideration the thickness, colours and any special features you may need. It is a highly individualised process and unique to every customer.

A Max ZB in the custom-fit process - The white chalk line is the alteration, in this case narrowing down the bicep.
On receipt of your completed Custom-Fit form, your measurements are run through our in-house system, which entails; comparing your measurements and body shape with previous customers. This enables us to see differences between new and previous customers and make the necessary adjustments.
The pattern is drawn onto neoprene sheets and all your custom alterations are made by the custom team before your wetsuit is cut for production.


The blindstitch machine in action
The wetsuit is then cut, printed and stitched. The wetsuit pictured is the MAX winter model, which means the seams are double glued and blind-stitched with a curved needle. This ensures the seams are water tight as the needle never passes right through the neoprene. The inside seams of this particular model are then completely lined with heat tape for added warmth and comfort.

At Seventhwave, every detail is checked and re-checked
Over 25 years of wetsuit-making experience goes into each suit, and Seventhwave’s artisan touch means each wetsuit is finished to the highest possible standard. How many wetsuits have you owned that didn’t even have the ends of the stitching tied down? At Seventhwave every detail — from thread ends to the end product — is checked and re-checked. That’s why we have a warranty on the construction and workmanship on all Seventhwave wetsuits.

Finished wetsuit, ready for dispatch
The Seventhwave website is comprehensive and makes the process easy to follow and complete. With the distance barrier removed, as the customer no longer has to visit to get a custom, Seventhwave have made custom wetsuits for people all over the world.  The measurement chart, online process and free worldwide shipping have seen wetsuits sent to Peru, Canada, Ireland, South Africa, Japan and even Switzerland.


Custom-Fit - Online - Worldwide

Click here to get yours



Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Japanese Yamamoto Limestone neoprene.
We are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a new and warmer way.

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

And best of all - check out our website!

Thursday, November 21, 2013

Wetsuit Tip #4: How to fold up and pack a wetsuit.

Follow this technique to minimize any creasing and damage with your wetsuit. Especially when packing for travel. If storing your wetsuit for long periods avoid placing heavy or sharp objects on or near your wetsuit.



If your wetsuit is a neck entry (chest zip or ZB style) leave the zip undone.
If its a back zip wetsuit, do the zip up.

1. Lay the wetsuit face down on a flat surface.

2. Fold the lower legs back at the knee area. (The same place your knee folds)

3. Fold the arms back on an angle to the waist - they crisscross.

4. Fold in half backwards at the waist.

5. Wetsuit is now folded into a tidy little package and will slide into a bag of fit into a carton.

6. If you need to fit into a courier bag, fold in half again to make it smaller.

Wetsuit Storage

The best way to store wetsuits is flat (with no weight on them) or on a smooth plastic coat hanger. Do not use a thin wire hanger. It will damage the shoulder area very quickly.

The perfect way to hang your wetsuit is with a  Ventilator Quick Dry Hanger. The hanger is designed to hold your wetsuit open to increase circulation and speed up the drying process.






Seventhwave Wetsuits are made in New Zealand from Japanese Yamamoto Limestone neoprene. Seventhwave Wetsuits are different because we make each wetsuit Custom-Fit to the customers measurements. We like to get your measurements and details and then custom make your preferred wetsuit model and thickness to your exact size and shape. We think that's why we get such good feedback from our customers, many of whom come back again and again. To own a Seventhwave wetsuit is to support New Zealand made, to stand up for quality and to experience water sports in a new and warmer way.

Follow us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

And best of all - check out our website!


Custom-Fit   Online - Worldwide

Click here to get yours